When you've been dealing in replacement roofs and repairs for as many years as we have, you end up hearing no shortage of stories.  Some are good, some are bad, and some are just too unbelievable for words.  One that keeps popping up is the all-too-common tale about how some roofing companies will offer to pay the homeowner's deductible, in exchange for being given the job.

Now, this might sound enticing to some--especially those who without the resources to pay their deductible. But keep in mind that it can end up creating more problems than one might have originally started out with.

If a Roofer Offers to Pay Your Deductible in Exchange for Work

There are a great deal of legalities we could site here, but in the spirit of keeping things short and to the point, let's just say that having a roofing contractor (or any service company) pay your deductible could result in your homeowner's policy being canceled.  Under law, it the responsibility of the party who suffered the loss to pay the first portion of the claim, with the balance being provided by the carrier.

Some contractors and home improvement companies understand that times are tough following a loss of real significance, and will capitalize on this in an effort to secure the work.  It's a shady tactic from an unethical perspective, though many don't realize that it could end up jeopardizing their active coverage and future premiums.

Finding a Dallas Roofing Company with Integrity

Insurance companies do not overpay claims. The government has never had to “bail out” an insurance company. Insurance pays fair replacement value – your deductible, enough to execute restoration work with new materials and skilled labor. Contractors that participate in the practice of “waiving” deductibles find themselves in a quandary… Deliver a quality product or make profit? They will most always pick profit.

Likely scenarios for contractors like this is to not pay their material distributors, their laborers and their bills in general to cover for this practice. It can easily end up with sub-contractors knocking on your door telling you they were never paid for the work they did on your home or material supply companies attaching mechanics liens to your property for unpaid invoices.